Tag Archives: Social media

Teresa Chin – The isolated nurse who created a community of 60,000

Teresa felt isolated in her nursing career so took to Twitter to find nurses who felt the same. She is now the driving force behind @WeNurses, a modern day online nursing revolution with over 60,000 active followers sharing information, ideas, knowledge and support in order to improve patient care.

In healthcare circles Teresa Chin is a social media guru, a skilled communicator, connector of people and a conversation starter, that is as long as those conversations are 140 characters or less.

Back in the 1990s Teresa worked as a nurse in a variety of different roles before becoming an agency nurse and working predominantly in elderly care. She said, “Being an agency nurse allowed me to balance my work and life commitments very well. The downside is that you don’t belong to any single team and have to seek out your own on going training. I felt quite isolated, and after a rant at my husband Nick, he suggested connecting with other nurses via Twitter.” Teresa had not yet embraced social media and at first dismissed the idea feeling reluctant to communicate with people she had never met. However after continual encouragement from her husband she decided to set up an account.

She started out anonymously as @AgencyNurse in 2010 and began tweeting about articles she’d read or new things at work. This sparked conversations quite quickly which both surprised and encouraged Teresa. She then created the @WeNurses Twitter handle to organise Twitter discussions every other Thursday. Teresa soon realised that there were lots of nurses who really wanted to discuss various topics from employment rights to new policies in healthcare. It was clear to her that social media could be a great way to engage nurses, to start discussions and help the large nursing community. She then decided to create a website for WeNurses to become an online community that could share the Twitter discussions. This started in 2012. “From early on Nick helped me out with the technical side, setting up the social accounts, building websites, integrating Twitter into the sites and making sure all the conversations were captured.”

WeNurses quickly grew, attracting healthcare professionals from all over the world with the current count on Twitter being nearly 60,000 active followers. As a result of this success lots of people started contacting Teresa asking if she could initiate discussions on specific subjects and in 2014 Teresa decided to set up WeCommunities which is a virtual space that could connect, drive and support specific tweeting communities within the medical world. WeCommunities hold discussions on chosen subjects, then all of the information from the chats are logged and stored on the site. This bank of resources is constantly growing and amassing ground breaking information, links to sites, journal articles, infographics and other important information that otherwise would be hard to get hold of. There is also a ‘Twitterversity’ which is a step-by-step guide to using Twitter on a professional level. Teresa said, “One of the most interesting discussions we had was when Plymouth University contacted me and wanted to run a discussion around sustainability in the NHS, but they wanted to include their colleagues in Spain. So initially we had half the people tweeting in English and half tweeting in Spanish. Within about 15 minutes people we knew who were English started using Google Translate to tweet in Spanish and vice versa. It was great fun as well as a great discussion.” Ideas and opinions can now be shared outside the confines of a specific hospital and experts worldwide can feed into these global conversations, improving knowledge and shaping day-to-day practice.

WeNurses are coming up to their fifth birthday and although Teresa has had lots of amazing feedback, it has been a tough journey. What drives her she said, was that feeling of being disconnected from other nurses, which she didn’t want anybody else to feel. She was also determined to succeed after various bosses told her it couldn’t be done. As well as online support, Teresa has also had recognition from ‘very high up’. She came home one day to see a letter on the floor that had ‘On Her Majesty’s Service’ stamped at the top.  She thought it was a parking ticket. It wasn’t. It was an MBE nomination for her services to nursing. “This was such a honour and as soon as the community found out I was receiving an MBE, Twitter went mad.”

Around 50% of the population use social media, and Teresa’s goal is to get at least 50% of nurses using social media as a professional platform. Teresa may have started out trying to stay ahead of the ever evolving policies and training within the NHS, but she has inadvertently ended up amassing an army of professionals who are now fully embracing the power of social media and are redefining the way information is shared within the healthcare industry.

www.wecommunities.org

The future is bright

We believe that the future is bright, that health will improve and that progressive pharma will be successful. Led by emerging science, amplified by technology and powered by engaged patients.

The scale and impact of progress, will be at the discretion of a new breed of physician, the millennial HCP (mHCP). Digitally native, their number increases year-on-year.

Of course, they exhibit many of the traits of their predecessors; knowledge, empathy, ambition. We’re comfortable with the healthcare professional in them. But what about this other side – the millennial? What does it mean when your homework group included Google and Wikipedia? When you spent 14 months of your medical education online? And when you haven’t written by hand for more than a month?

Millennials are visual. They choose SnapChat, YouTube and Instagram. 72% of them use emojis to communicate their emotions – no language has ever grown more quickly.

Millennials are visual

Millennials are visual

Millennials embrace progress. 95% make positive associations with the word ‘change’. Their digital tools of choice are in a constant state of beta, as they look to optimise their digital being.

Millennials demand more. They believe big business should take as much responsibility as the government. And, as illustrated by the UK Government and Junior Doctor dispute, they believe in collective power.

It would be wrong to define this generation by their birth certificates, and to suggest that this population only includes those born after 1980. Instead, it is a generation that was forged in the last two decades as its members immersed themselves in a new world. Their habits and personalities have evolved with the technology around them. Put simply, they are digital.

In this world, insight, creativity and design are more important than ever. CREATIVE agencies have a critical role to play, aiding and supporting mHCPs to leverage the science and technology at their disposal.

Scientific knowledge has been, and always will be, the critical capability of physicians. The shift, is in their expertise and confidence with technology. And our opportunity is to recognise these new skills, supporting mHCPs in improving outcomes.

Capabilities

Capabilities

Much of the industry boasts an exciting pipeline of products. As we look to build these brands and partner with healthcare professionals, let’s not forget the millennial within them 😉

To find out more about the impact of the millennial generation on healthcare, sign up for the new white paper, podcast, and YouTube series from Havas Lynx at www.m-hcp.com

References
The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. State Health Facts 2015. http://kaiserf.am/1VfEncN (Accessed May 2016)
Ofcom. Media Use and Attitudes Report 2015 http://bit.ly/1E3fFyO (Accessed May 2016)
Docmail. The death of handwriting. 2012 http://bit.ly/1srFRoG (Accessed May 2016)
Bangor University & Talk Talk Mobile. Linguistics Research. 2015. http://bit.ly/1HseRrW (Accessed May 2016)
Pepsi Optimism Project. 2008. http://bit.ly/1R6meY1 (Accessed May 2016)

Generation Now.

The Millennial HCP, by David Hunt

The impact of the millennial healthcare professional on our world.

Millennials are criticised as narcissistic, entitled and technology-obsessed, but our new campaign shows millennial healthcare professionals – mHCPs – in a different light. They have certainly grown up in a digital and interactive world, but have a strong social conscience, are entrepreneurial and are adept at communicating, collaborating and adapting to the world as they find it.

Through a series of in-depth interviews with medical students, academics, innovators, physicians, authors and patients from around the world, Generation Now identifies a new & inspired generation of healthcare professionals. It is a generation with different attitudes and ambitions to their predecessors, and it is a generation who will drive our industry forward and embrace innovation to offer improved outcomes for all.

In our new campaign, we outline key considerations for communicating and collaborating with this new generation, outlining how we can create effective healthcare campaigns that truly make a difference.

For more information on our YouTube & Podcast series, and our White Paper visit www.m-hcp.com

#LXAcademy
#MillennialHCP

The Post-millennial Healthcare Professional

The Future of Healthcare, by David Hunt

It’s estimated that around 6,000 students are beginning their final year of Medicine at UK universities. The majority will be 23 years old, born in 1992. ‘Googling’ has been mainstream since they were 10. Facebook became a thing when they were 12. Phones became smart when they were just 15. They haven’t lived through a digital revolution (they missed that). They’ve simply lived in a digital world.

I know, I know, we all know healthcare professionals. I’ve been advertising to them for 15 years, some of my colleagues have played golf with them for even longer, and our research is infinite. But what about tomorrow’s generation? Those who will choose kindle over paperbacks, being social online to offline, who learn to wire a plug on YouTube?

What about those who will think nothing about sharing their every experience? Of course, much will be a personal commentary, a social diary or an analysis of current affairs. But, it will also articulate their clinical experience and opinions; it will outline their decisions, and help shape their community’s conclusion.

It’s entirely unnecessary to document their use of digital and perhaps more controversially, I’m also unmoved by their apps of choice or their preferred platform (they’ll change). My interest is sparked by their behaviour, their attitudes, and their motivations. When the whole world has always been at your fingertips, how does this alter your perspective? When your limits are not defined by geography, the classroom, or your personal experience; what defines your ambition? When you have studied Medicine in today’s technology-enabled world, what do you do next?

Like every generation before them, I hope they will be beset on changing the world. Uniquely, they may just have the experience, education and tools to do just that. I question whether they will accept operating within the archaic environments prevalent in healthcare today? ‘Generation Now’ has not been programmed to be patient.

As always, I’m excited to see what’s next. Beyond wishing them luck, I hope we take the time to offer our support.
Dr._Mario

Millennials, who’d have them?

Building an agency, by David Hunt

Born in 1980, I’m a borderline Millennial depending on your preferred interpretation. Regardless, I can still feel like an old man when it comes to Millennial engagement in the work place, which is why I’m so proud of our retention rate. Many agencies struggle to retain bright, ambitious talent, whereas at Havas Lynx, we prosper.

We believe Millennials want to make a difference and at Havas Lynx, we are committed to doing just that. We focus on improving patient outcomes; to drive commercial success for our partners. But our efforts don’t end with the client budget, we go much further. In 2015, we’ve already funded the education of 42 children in Africa.

We believe that Millennials want to exist within a vibrant community. #LYNXLife was launched to preserve and enhance our culture. It includes a tea lady, breakfast club and Summer Fun day offline, and Facebook and Instagram, online. To get involved, join us by following #LYNXLife.

Each year we conduct an internal survey.  Of 200+ participants 30 %  said professional development was their key priority. Many people challenge our investment in #LXAcademy accusing it of being excessive but I’d challenge us to spend more.

We try our best to shun excessive structure and hierarchy. Yes, the ultimate decision resides with the senior team but you won’t find us hiding in an office. To my knowledge, no-one at either Havas Lynx, or formerly Creative Lynx, has had their own office, and it’s my intention to maintain this record.

It’s up for debate how many of these principles are specific to Millennials and to me, it simply sounds like good business. But then again, maybe that’s just the Millennial in me.

Campervan

Why I don’t care what’s next

Innovation, by David Hunt

Firstly, I do care, and perhaps should be less flippant. However, commentating on the next pioneering technology is a really good excuse to ignore our deficiencies with the current tools at our disposal. I’d argue that we already have the technology necessary to build meaningful relationships, and our focus should be on maximising these.

Fully leveraging new technology during its infancy is unlikely. In the gaming world, it typically takes 12-18 months for engineers to fully utilise the power of the hardware offered by the latest generation of console. It’s okay for us to take our time, assuming we are making progress, building expertise and confidence. If we are getting closer to adopting the technology and enhancing the breadth of our communication platform – that’s okay. Progress doesn’t always have to be quick, but it should still be progress. Ask Yahoo, MySpace and Blackberry if they’d have sacrificed being first to be the best.

And, while we’re exploring what we already have, let’s play with what the future holds. I’ve always considered myself to be curious, and therefore quick to try the latest technology. Today, at Havas Lynx, I’m surrounded by millennials. To my astonishment, they are more demanding than me and more impatient than me – no mean feat. They are also much more agile in their take-up of technology. Aligned with experience, it is meaningful innovation beset on making a difference.

Do we need more technology? Or do we need to be better at using it? I’d argue that, if we ensure the latter, the former will bring more value.

Orchestrator

What makes Havas Lynx special?

The #LXAcademy, by David Hunt

“What is your point of difference?”, “Why should I work with you?”, or my personal favourite, “What makes Havas Lynx so special?” The answer is always the same – the people. But “people” does not just happen by chance. It takes investment, it takes values & it takes culture.

On the 30th of April we launched #LXAcademy 2015 at Manchester Town Hall. It was an awesome event, which reflected our commitment to, and investment in, skills development. Lucy May was inspiring as she discussed the opportunities for progressive change in healthcare with a commitment to a more holistic patient journey, fuelled by creativity. Dave Birss then followed with some phenomenal case studies that were deconstructed to their core, as we explored the discipline behind creativity. Dave beautifully illustrated the power of ideas to drive change across society. However, the greatest point of inspiration was the collective passion & expertise of the Havas Lynx community, with over two-hundred experts committed to Helpful Change in healthcare.

Over the next six months there will be over one-hundred sessions, covering Agency Fundamentals, through to Core Expertise and Thought Leadership. Not everyone in an agency has an eye for design, not everyone can use PowerPoint, and not everyone has a quality first approach – they should. The curriculum for Agency Fundamentals seeks to change this. Numerous articles and research papers discuss the most likely reason an agency would be sacked, and it’s almost always a lack of quality, attention to detail, or put another way – the fundamentals. The details count, and they are a priority for Havas Lynx.

I’d like to be a better CEO, and I’m sure that I am not alone in wanting to be better at the day job. We’ll be tackling payors and market access, content designed for a more social world, and the account teams will spend time with a restaurant manager to discuss silver service. It’s amazing the amount agencies spend on recruitment and salaries, and then neglect training and development.

The Thought Leadership programme will include discussing teamwork and marginal gains in a Formula One pit-lane, how an NHS Trust uses twitter to manage patient well-being and how the police negotiate with terrorists. All of the sessions are made available on YouTube, with last year’s #LXAcademy attracting 100,000 views, to further validate the quality.

Like all things the success of the #LXAcademy 2015 will be based on the people, the more they put in the more they will get out. As always, I’m happy backing the Havas Lynx community.